How to transform a kid’s room into a teenager’s room

There’s a reason that teenagers are stereotyped as always staying in their bedroom. It’s a room that they can use to express themselves and hoard all the gadgets, toys, games and posters that help shape their personality. Thanks to some expert help from Amtico, this guide should give you the “do’s and don’ts” of how to transform a kid’s room into a teenager’s room.

 

transform a kid’s room into a teenager’s room

 

Don’t make assumptions

Teenagers hate being pandered to, just like adults do. Decorating their room yourself isn’t always a bad idea, but if you aren’t sure what they’re interested in, don’t start buying merchandise from bands or tv shows without asking! Even if you get a few of them right, there’s nothing worse than your teenage son or daughter thinking you don’t understand them.

 

Make sure it has the furniture they’ll need

It’s common sense to have a bed in a bedroom, but you’d be surprised how many teenagers end up without a desk for studying or a wardrobe to store their clothes! Not everybody needs these things, but it’s much easier to set them up ahead of time, just in case.

 

Aim for comfort

Some parents try to force their teenagers out of their rooms with bad internet access, poor heating or uncomfortable furniture, but this does a lot more harm than good. Teens need a place to relax and recover after a stressful school day or drama-filled weekend.

 

Match their personality

Not all teenagers fit the stereotypes we’re used to, so it’s really important to focus on them and their hobbies. They may prefer a clean and clear space to help them work, or might want plenty of sunlight to help them grow healthy indoor plants – you never know until you ask!

 

Fit it around your child’s bad qualities

Children aren’t perfect – as much as some parents refuse to admit it – and there’ll always be something they do that can be a problem down the line. If they prefer to eat meals in their room, or spray a lot of perfume when the door is closed, make sure they have a way to keep themselves clean and safe: bins and easy-to-open windows might seem like common sense, but they’re easy to overlook.

 

Listen to them

There’s no point asking a teenager what they want if you aren’t going to try and give it to them: let them have a say in how you redesign their room, and don’t jump to conclusions. If your child says they want proper commercial flooring, giving them a rug can seem like a slap in the face.

 

If you absolutely can’t give them what they want, explain it ahead of time and see if there’s anything else they might want as a replacement. It’ll save you both a lot of stress in the long run!

 

Let them rearrange it

It’s easy for teenagers to get frustrated, especially if they don’t feel comfortable in their own private space. Try to use furniture and decorations that are easy to move around – the more they can do on their own, the easier it’ll be for them to adjust the room to their liking. You could even let them plan out where all the furniture will go in the finished room.

 

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