How to Let Light Into Your Home

light into your home

When designing an interior, new doors – especially glazed ones – can make all the difference to a home’s airy feeling. However, there can be no substitute for glazing if you really want to get an open sense of space in your home. Put another way, you need to flood your home with light if you want to create living quarters that feel more spacious than they actually are. Of course, light colours and careful use of artificial lighting have their place too when creating this sort of illusion, but windows still make the most noticeable difference. The trouble is that planning regulations often mean that you are not allowed to add windows in places where they would work best. What can be done?

South facing rear gardens have the most potential for allowing more light into a home. A typical way to achieve this is with the addition of patio doors. A great option for homes which can benefit from an additional access point, French doors, sliding patio doors and even the addition of a conservatory can all add to more light inside the house. However, you may not enjoy this option, particularly if you have tall buildings which overlook your back garden from which people might then be able to see into your home. Side walls can usually also benefit from the installation of an extra window. If this means the privacy of your neighbour might be compromised, then opt for a slim window which is located above eye level. This way more light can be allowed into your home without the problem of being able to accidentally see into next door’s property.

When building an extension, it is always worth considering the amount of light which will be removed from a home’s interior. Where you previously enjoyed an open aspect, you may now have an internal door leading to the new part of the house. Therefore, extensions which run off the back or the side of a home can benefit greatly from glazed roofing. By installing a roof lantern, for example, any extension can feel like it is part of the rest of the home but one which enjoys a tremendous amount of natural light – the perfect thing for a day room or open plan living space. Indeed, aluminium-framed roof lanterns can be painted to any colour, so they will fit in with the structural look of just about any dwelling.

When the addition of conventional glazing is just not an option, perhaps because of security issues or of being overlooked, a good option to go for is a light pipe. These are tubular devices which allow natural light to come into your home without the need for a window. Collecting natural light that is hitting the roof or the wall of your home, they can pipe it to anywhere in your home that you might want more light via a system of mirrors. They are particularly useful for internal corridors where installing an externally-facing window is impossible.

Finally, remember that more light will come into your home with light coloured window frames. White reflects the most light and is the most popular choice for this reason. Avoid darker hues, particularly brown, if you want that light and airy feeling in your home.

 

 

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1 Comment

  1. August 27, 2015 / 6:01 pm

    I didn’t think about the homes light levels when building before. Maybe I should look into how dark it’s going to be in my living room before building the extension off of it. It will probably end up needing more lights in the room.

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