Home » TED Talks on Racism – to Inspire and Educate

TED Talks on Racism – to Inspire and Educate

Today  – TED talks on Racism

In this day and age, there are plenty of ways to show support in the fight to end systemic racism. Donating to organizations that support minority groups, attending protests, being vocal on social media, and having conversations with our peers are just some of the ways we can help.

But not being racist isn’t enough. We must strive to become anti-racism, which is why it’s so important to educate ourselves and delve deep into why racism still exists today and what’s fueling it in America and all over the globe.

 

Inspirational TED Talks on Racism

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Inspirational TED talks on Racism

So, check out these inspirational TED Talks that on racism and strive for more understanding and to do better in your anti-racist practice.

 

1

How to Deconstruct Racism, One Headline at a Time

Baratunde Thurston is an activist, a comedian and an Emmy-nominated writer who addresses serious issues like racism and strives to shape the world we know today. On his thought-provoking TED Talk, “How to Deconstruct Racism, one Headline at a Time,” he focuses on the phenomenon of white people calling the cops to report a crime when a Black person is simply eating, walking, going about their lives, or as he calls it, “living while black.”

 

 

2

What It Takes to Be Racially Literate

Priya Vulchi, co-founder of CHOOSE and author of “Tell Me Who You Are” got together with Winona Guo, a Harvard College and co-author of the book, and traveled to all 50 US states. Their mission was to gather first-hand stories related to intersectionality and racism. In their inspiring Ted Talk, “What It Takes to Be Racially Literate,” they combine the stories they collected with research and statistics to shine a light on America’s racial literacy in order to better understand the problem and improve a world that’s being affected by racial division.

As Inspirational Ted talks on Racism goes this one certainly required some research dedication

 

 

 

3

The Difference Between Being “Not Racist” and Antiracist

Ibram X. Kendi is an author and historian who writes about ending discrimination and racism in all its forms. In his Ted Talk, “The Difference Between Being ‘Not Racist’ and “Antiracist,” he talks about what defines racism and how society should take responsibility and reject racism in the workplace, personal beliefs, and public policies. The goal in this conversation is to uproot inequality all over the world and replace hate with love. He believes that people in society are either racist or actively anti-racist.

 

 

4

An Interview With the Founders of Black Lives Matter

Writer and activist Alicia Garza launched a worldwide movement with a Facebook post that ended with the phrase: “Black lives matter.” Then, artist and organizer Patrisse Cullors created the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter. Human rights activist Opal Tometi also played a role by taking the phrase “Black Lives Matter” on social media, which sparked an online movement. And family activist Mia Birdsong joined this strong group of women to advocate for the self-determination of everyday people. So, in their Ted Talk, “An Interview With the Founders of Black Lives Matter,” these powerful women share their advice on how people can participate to ensure that everyone gets to enjoy the same freedom, no matter what race they are.

 

 

 

 

5

Why it’s So Hard to Talk About the N-Word

Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor is a historian who writes, teaches and asks important questions related to the history of race and racism in America. In her TED Talk, “Why It’s So Hard to Talk About the N-Word,” Pryor examines the use of the N-word and reflects on the way we debate race.

She believes that having productive talks will help reshape education around the complex history of racism in America. If anyone knows this, it’s her. During the talk, she mentions how the word was used in her class by a student during her first year of teaching. She also shares how she initially told herself she’d never say it, not even to quote it. She calls stories like hers “points of encounter,” which is when one comes face-to-face with the N-word. Her discussion is not only history-backed but also a thoughtful examination into racism and one of the most horrible words in the English language.

 

 

6

The Symbols of Systemic Racism (and How to Take Away Their Power)

TED Talk senior fellow Paul Rucker is a multidisciplinary artist who explores topics like mass incarceration, racially motivated violence, and the consequences of policies that maintain inequality in society. So, in his TED Talk, “The Symbols of Systemic Racism (and How to Take Away Their Power),” Rucker unravels the many layers of systemic racism in America. He also discusses his collection of artifacts connected to the dark chapter in the country’s history like branding irons and shackles.

He states that if everyone took the time to accept that these objects are part of history, we could all find a way to take away the frightening power that it has over those who have suffered from them. But be warned that this TED Talk does contain some graphic images.

 

 

7

The Real Story of Rosa Parks – And Why we Need to Confront Myths About Black History

David Ikard is a professor of African American and Diaspora Duties. So, he definitely knows what he’s talking about when he points out in his TED Talk, that black history has been white washed for years. In “The Real Story of Rosa Parks – And Why we Need to Confront Myths About Black History,” Ikard explains that the way Black history is taught in schools across America is often diluted and full of inaccuracies. Worst of all, it also lacks the most important elements, like full-bodied historical figures and context. So, he delves deep into the real story of Rosa Parks, the woman who refused to give up her seat for a white person, and how her actions led to a real change for Blacks. But Ikard also discusses how turning stories like these into something that’s easier to digest can do more harm than good, which is why he stresses the value of historical accuracy in this incredible talk.

 

 

 

I do hope these inspirational TED Talks that on racism have educated you, moved you and motivated you.  Do you have any Inspirational TED talks on Racism to share, if so do drop me a comment I’d love to hear from you

 

 

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